May Center School for Brain Injury and Related Disorders

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About Brain Injury.

Each year, approximately 2.4 million children and adults in the U.S. sustain a traumatic brain injury (TBI), and another 795,000 sustain a non-traumatic brain injury.

Acquired brain injury refers to a traumatic or non-traumatic brain injury that occurs after birth. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is caused by an external force. Non-traumatic brain injury occurs as a result of disease or illness.
Acquired brain injury refers to a traumatic or non-traumatic brain injury that occurs after birth. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is caused by an external force. Non-traumatic brain injury occurs as a result of disease or illness - See more at: http://mayinstitute-brocktonschool.dev.neptuneweb.com/about/brain-injury.html#sthash.aNMPrHLX.dpuf
Acquired brain injury refers to a traumatic or non-traumatic brain injury that occurs after birth. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is caused by an external force. Non-traumatic brain injury occurs as a result of disease or illness. - See more at: http://mayinstitute-brocktonschool.dev.neptuneweb.com/about/brain-injury.html#sthash.aNMPrHLX.dpuf
Acquired brain injury refers to a traumatic or non-traumatic brain injury that occurs after birth. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is caused by an external force. Non-traumatic brain injury occurs as a result of disease or illness - See more at: http://mayinstitute-brocktonschool.dev.neptuneweb.com/about/brain-injury.html#sthash.aNMPrHLX.dpuf

Those most likely to sustain a TBI are children ages birth-4, adolescents ages 15-19, and adults 65+. TBI is a contributing factor in one third of all injury-related deaths in the U.S. TBI-related deaths are three times more common among males than among females (CDC 2010). Currently, more than 5.3 million children and adults in the U.S. live with a lifelong disability as a result of TBI (Brain Injury Association of America).

Although it can be a devastating diagnosis, there is much cause for hope. With the right treatment, people with brain injury can and do make significant progress in regaining skills.

Treatment should include rehabilitation and special education services through a multidisciplinary team of professionals, including licensed psychologists, physical and occupational therapists, speech and language pathologists, behavioral specialists, and teachers specifically trained in the treatment of brain injury. Residential services can also be useful for individuals who need extra care.